A few 7.5 questions...

  1. When I open my projects, the metronome defaults to a pan position of L90. I don’t want that. I change it to the center, save the project and when I reopen the project, it’s back to L90. I want it in the center. How can I fix this?

  2. I use a two screen layout L = project, R = mixer - both sized to fill the screens. When I open projects, the mixer opens slightly lower (approximately the distance as if a task bar is there. I adjust it, save. It reopens as though I hadn’t readjusted it. (I have “Displays have separate spaces” disabled.)

  3. Why does the ASIO performance meter show ~75% when Activity Monitor shows Cubase using ~17% and ~60% or so idle?

1. When I open my projects, the metronome defaults to a pan position of L90. I don’t want that. I change it to the center, save the project and when I reopen the project, it’s back to L90. I want it in the center. How can I fix this?

2. I use a two screen layout L = project, R = mixer - both sized to fill the screens. When I open projects, the mixer opens slightly lower (approximately the distance as if a task bar is there. I adjust it, save. It reopens as though I hadn’t readjusted it. (I have “Displays have separate spaces” disabled.)

3. Why does the ASIO performance meter show ~75% when Activity Monitor shows Cubase using ~17% and ~60% or so idle?

1- there is no panning for the metronome in the metronome setup. Are you using the default beep or some custom sound ?

2 - If both mixer and main window have their own monitor and both are set to fill the screen, any difference on the real filling of the screen should be dealt with the monitors own menu. It looks like the monitor has not the standard settings.

3- i guess you mean the difference between performance monitor and asio performance.
Read this article: http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/oct09/articles/qa1009_1.htm
It is a few years old, but still relevant.

The ASIO performance indicates how close any one of the cores is getting to 100 percent occupied, while the performance monitor shows the overall state of the processor. So it is very important, if you want to use your machine to the max, that the strain on the different cores is as much as possible evenly divided over the available cores.
Loading too much into a single core (of a multicore processor) results in serious underusage of your possible overall performance and ASIO overloads while you have still f.e. 75% of the total core unused. For that reason, people who use (sometimes) hundreds of tracks use the VEP5. That addon lets you do the assignment of the corehandling by yourself, and it is also more efficient in processing the dll’s.
WIthout VEP5 you can have more or less the same results. Key is here to avoid as much as possible the multitimbral functionalities of those vsti’s which are written to be single core used. Use for every instrument a new dll so that cubase can handle these on their own and spread them over all the available cores.
ROMPLERS like Halion and Kontakt also have a dedicated function where you can assign (reserve) some cores for only that plugin. Cut that most of the times means also that these cores are not available anymore for the rest of the system. This can result in conflicts with the DAW itself. It really depends on what you are trying to do.

kind regards,
R.

Thanks for the reply. To answer your questions, I’m using the standard metronome beep. The panning for the metronome is found in the Control Room.

The monitor is indeed using standard settings. Basically Cubase loads it about an inch too low on the screen - so I can see part of my desktop in that monitor. I have to grab the window and slide it up…every time I open the project.