Beginner's guide

I seem to remember somebody has kindly written an introductory guide to Dorico 3.5. I can’t find it anywhere? Where is it to be found?

You’re probably thinking of this one: Dropbox - A Beginner's Guide to Dorico.pdf - Simplify your life (and I don’t think @DanKreider’s updated it for a while, though I’m sure much of it is still very relevant).

There’s also the excellent official Dorico First Steps Documentation courtesy of @Lillie_Harris

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There is also a book by Darren Jones, e.g. here.

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It’s true. The official one is better, and I haven’t taken the time to update mine! Heck, the program’s big enough I’m not sure I’d be qualified any more…

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I know the feeling :wink:

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Lol, no you don’t…

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How about this? Dorico Basics: Notation Tools and Techniques - Notation Central

I think it’s the best detailed videos not a book, for beginners and pros. @pianoleo I leaned a lot from your video tutorials. Nice job!

Looks nice! Any chance there will be a kindle version?

Paolo

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Dan Kreider’s It’s an excellent way in

Absolutely you are! Please do it!

Paolo

Thank you all. This is so helpful. I may finally have convinced my colleague after a lifetime to substitute his pencil and architect’s drawing board for Dorico! So the info is for him.

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Never say never but I wouldn’t hold your breath :slight_smile:

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I’d like to second this in the strongest terms. There’s absolutely an opening for a chatty, encouraging, hold-the-reader’s-hand guide to Dorico. The official manual is by intention a comprehensive accounting of the contents, and it fulfills that role admirably, but the user who just wants to know “Can I do this thing? and if so, how?” often has to resort to Google and this forum. Darren Jones’s book, the First Steps document, and @DanKreider’s guide all cover the initial information very well – I’ve learned from all of them – but something that went further, through at least intermediate stages, would be highly valuable. A special help would be the inclusion of detailed guides to more advanced projects. (I think, as always, of @dspreadbury’s superb blog entry “Typesetting choral Preces and Responses” which could serve as a model for dozens more like it. It certainly boosted my facility by multiple levels when I worked completely through its instructions.)

Thanks for the encouraging words (and to @Rinaldo ). I would love to tackle something like that. To be completely transparent, I just don’t have time for unpaid projects these days. And I would hate to monetize it (if such a thing were even practical).

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That’s totally understandable. I don’t think monetizing such a publication would be at all inappropriate (I would certainly pay whatever it was worth)… but the question of your time is primary, and I do understand about that.