Can I publish songs, musics, sound effects commercially created under CUBASE Elements?

hi,

  1. I want to know if it is allowable to publish songs, musics, sound effects commercially created using CUBASE Elements ?

  2. For songs and musics are simple and direct, but for sound effects like a single kick effect after modified under CUBASE Elements, can I publish this modified sound clip ( single sound clip ) commercially ?

I have read the EULA, and hopefully questions above clear my doubt.

Please advise.

Hi and welcome to the forum,

  1. Yes, you can.
  2. I don’t know, but I would expect, you can’t.

hi, thanks for the feedback, I wondered is there any official cubase support email so that I can email them directly regarding question 2 before purchasing CUBASE Elements ?

Hi,

Get in touch with your official local Steinberg support, please.

What do you mean by “publish” in this context? Sell it as your own?
Either way, it doesn’t have anything to do with Cubase but rather from whom you purchased the original audio sample and their terms of agreement.

What do you mean by “publish” in this context? Sell it as your own?

  • publish here I am refers to publishing game sound effects, musics in Unity stores, Unreal Engine stores…etc

Either way, it doesn’t have anything to do with Cubase but rather from whom you purchased the original audio sample and their terms of agreement.

  • I understand, but for the sound effect as mentioned I really need to know whether is allowable to publish a modified version of sound clip commercially ?

Ok. So selling as your own for profit.
You need to check the Terms of Service from the company you bought these audio files from.

Well, if it’s sound design, once you have purchased Cubase (assuming you are referring to sounds by Cubase), you are free to use as desired, including selling a game that includes said sound effect, but yeah, read the Ts & Cs CAREFULLY.

What you can’t do as far as I know is to modify the sounds and then re-sell them as your own for other people to then use these modified sounds as sound effects.

For music things are a little more complex though…

I checked the support page before, but it directed to local distributor which landed on the Yamaha site with CUBASE 7 and now already version 13.

https://my.yamaha.com/en/products/music_production/steinberg_products/steinberg_software/cubase/index.html

For the second question, I wish there is on official feedback from CUBASE support via its email because I will be required by store providers such as Unity Store, Unreal Engine Store to provide legal copyright document to prove that the sound effects ( separate modified sound clips ) created are officially permitted by CUBASE.

I am very curious about CUBASE official support, why a single support email address also not listed. Anyway, I will email to local Yamaha and see.

For music things are a little more complex though…

  • strange, to me creating final music and get publish is very direct, not an issues though :slight_smile:

What you can’t do as far as I know is to modify the sounds and then re-sell them as your own for other people to then use these modified sounds as sound effects.

  • Yes, this sounds correct, actually I am just asking, as mostly I used Vital to create sound effects, their license allowed to publish separate sound clips created under Vital but cannot publish the “Presets”. That’s the reason I want to verify with CUBASE on this, what if I am using sound effects created using CUBASE own element ( sorry I am totally new to CUBASE ).

Just to be clear here. “Publish” and “Sell” is not the same thing.
Cubase is a product, not a company or licensor. Steinberg is the company that sells Cubase along with some content.

As I said before, it is not the tool (Cubase in this case) that you use to create your content with, it is the licensor of the source material you need to confer with.

“Just to be clear here. “Publish” and “Sell” is not the same thing.”

  • Sorry, if this confused you, to a software programmer, publishing a software (including sound related computer files) is actually means commercializing or selling.

“Cubase is a product, not a company or licensor. Steinberg is the company”

  • Yes, I am aware.

“it is the licensor of the source material you need to confer with.”

  • Yes, I also aware of this, correct me as I am wrong as I have not experience with current CUBASE version before, except the old days MSDOS CUBASE demo software which lead me back to CUBASE but I did worked with LMMS DAW, for example the instruments (material) of LMMS are from different creators, so I will refer to the creator of the materials in this case.
  • just a plan ahead to check, does CUBASE has any instruments that made by its company “Steinberg”, if there is, I wondered can I produce the sound clip using this instrument ( can be a synthesizer by Steinberg ) and “sell” it as separate modified sound clips without “selling” its original ( eg. like “Preset” in Vital ) ?

You would have thought so , right?

But, sticking a loop or any instrument, pre-played and pre-produced and releasing it, runs a few danger points.

First of all, another could have released same loop/instrument part and claimed it as their own and secondly, streaming services are picking up on pre-produced material passed on as original and can create all sorts of problems upon release of said material.

Wow, this is some good knowledge to know, thanks for the sharing, much appreciated.

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I’m sorry, but it does not. Publishing in its strictest sense means “make available for the public”. So when we are talking about these samples of yours, you could most likely publish them on your internet blog, which is very much different from selling them in an online store.

Yes, Cubase comes with some virtual instruments. How many and which depends on what edition you purchase. You can compare the different editions here.

Using a virtual synthesizer, such as Retrologue 2 for example, you can create and sell what ever you wish.
Cubase also sells with sample players, such as HALion Sonic SE and GrooveAgent SE. In those cases I believe what matters are the samples played back by those instruments, not the use of those instruments themselves.

I hope that clears things up somewhat. :slight_smile:

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Noted, appreciated for the feedback.

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Interesting. Do you have any actual cases of this ever happened?

Not directly, but have come across forums that discussed the issue from other musicians who had some problems.

I think we are talking very blatant stuff though, an actual loop, in your face, being claimed as your own , etc.

Spotify and the rest can send you a notice that your recording contains pre-mastered, pre-recorded material with a warning notice.

I tried it once out of morbid curiosity as I heard about this.

I took a Heaviocity loop and created my own track on top of that, and that triggered the Algorithm to send me a warning message by the digital distributor I used (I think it was Tunecore at the time).

It’s a legal minefield. Not even hardware synthesizers that you pay through the nose legally allow you to own the actual sounds. They are only licensed. Of course, no synth company in their right mind would start taking composers to court, but just goes to show…

As composer for films, I am trying to be extremely careful what I produce as I have agreements that are strict to do with copyrights etc.

Just so I understand this correctly. This is more an issue with the distributors auto detection processes, no? The ToS with Heavyocity should state that you have the right to use the material you purchased commercially even if it is the main building block of your composition. As I see it, it would never hold up in court.

Well… That is legal speak to prevent you from selling the raw sounds/samples as your own. It doesn’t apply when using them as intended in an original composition.
For funsies, look up how many commercially available songs use the “Ski Jam” preset of the Korg Wavestation—the very first preset on the synth!

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No I agree, but I can’t risk it personally, not in the field I am in.

It’s a grey area and although in theory it’s fine and all, I personally rather to be safe than sorry.

If there is no problem at all, what so ever, no warning should have been issued, anywhere, and I agree in that there is a huge chance this wouldn’t stand in court, but I rather not having to find out :blush:

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