Instrument change and cautionary accidentals

How do I get Dorico to always show cautionary accidentals when changing instrument?
In the shown example the Alto Saxophone (in Eb) changes to Flute (in C). As Dorico does not show cautionary accidentals before the multi-bar rest, the player would play in the key of A major on the flute but should play in C major.

Thanks in advance for your help!
Jens
instrument change.png

I’ve hit this too. Did you find an answer?

I’m afraid this is a little bug in the current version, which will be addressed in the forthcoming 1.0.20 update.

Thank you very much for your prompt reply, Daniel!

Happy New Year to everybody!

As I updated to version 1.0.20.4065 of Dorico, I checked if the bug regarding cancellations still exists.
And yes, this problem has been solved. At least partially (see “instrument change and cancellations#1.png”).

If the multi-bar rest moves to the beginning of a new system the cancellations disappear (see “instrument change and cancellations#2.png”).

Wouldn’t it be better to show the cancellations (and key changes due to instrument changes) right before the player re-enters on the new instrument? I think this is (also) common pracitce and recommended in the “Essential Dictionary of Music Notation”, page 19 (Alfred Publication, ISBN 0-88284-730-9).
instrument change and cancellations#1.PNG
instrument change and cancellations#2.PNG

For what it’s worth, we are following the recommendations in Gould’s book for where the actual transition between instruments should occur, which is immediately following the last note played on the original instrument, rather than immediately before the first note of the new one.

Thank you very much for you reply, Daniel!

It is quite okay if the cancellations are shown immediately following the last note played. However, they should even be shown at the end of the system if the multi-bar rest moves to the beginning of the next system, even though it is forced by a manual system break, don’t you think?

Yes, I agree on that point, and we’ll take a look at that.