Optional octave?

I’m writing something for flugelhorn that ends on a sounding G3, but since flugelhorn is a conical bore instrument, it is capable of playing the fundamental G2. I’d like to write that note as optional since every player won’t be able to produce it without sounding flatulent… How can I make the lower octave an option?

I normally just add the optional note as an interval above/below the “playable” one and then make it cue size. You could add it in a separate voice but I don’t.

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I often use what Daniel is suggesting, for my contrabass parts (when you aren’t sure whether you will have bassists with C/Bb extensions).

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I recently tried the same basic approach as @DanielMuzMurray and @Michel_Edward , but with the desired notes full-sized and the optional substitutes cue-sized.

In this case, I’m pushing the bass clarinet down into it’s lower end, but giving the player (who’s doubling with (mostly) baritone sax) the option of a fifth higher if they think they will struggle or won’t get a good sound on the lower notes:

Of course, you could always introduce the term flatulando into the musical lexicon… :smirk:

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Flatulando LOL. Maybe my description as “flatulent” was inappropriate, but I believe it is accurate…

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No offense whatsoever taken here, @David_Campo . (And believe me, I’ve heard plenty of instrumental sounds for which that would be the most appropriate “inappropriate” term one could appropriate to describe them…! :smile:)

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Of course now there are whole videos on the long history of “wind” instruments …

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[We have, of course, gotten off topic, but…]

And of course there’s also the tromboon, so “delicately” deployed by the composer P.D.Q. Bach (1807–1742?) in the duet “Bide thy thyme” from his grand oratorio The Seasonings (S. 1/2 tsp.).

For anyone who actually wishes to go further down this…um…track:

Here’s a little…uh“gem” of a website from the — I kid you not — Invisible College of Experimental Flatology website examining the science “behind” the acoustic properties of the tenor trombone and…well…

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