Selectively tying multiple common adjacent notes in chords?

I’m often having to write organ/synth “pad” parts. What I’ll do is play various chords, mostly half-notes or whole notes, in a long string of chords. Many chords will have notes in common, but some notes will change from bar to bar.

In my old days with Finale, there was a nifty little function which I’d use a lot. I’d select all the bars, apply “tie common notes,” and all the notes would be tied across barlines IF they were common. Notes that “moved” would not be tied.

Is there a way to do this in Dorico? It would be a huge time saver, rather than having to tie notes individually, invoking the carat, deleting inadvertent ties that “jump” to notes many bars away, etc. I’ve viewed several videos and the help pages, but I couldn’t see anything, forgive me if I’m missing it.

Thank you!

I’m not sure if you already know about this but if you select the first note that you want tied and press T, it will tie to the next instance of that note. You can then just keep pressing T until that note is done?

That’s all I can think of!

If you write a lot of pads, do you know about a feature of Dorico that was written at the request of Alan Silvestri that will extend notes until the next note entered so that one could, say, enter notes as eighth notes to set their starting points and then use the function to extend them to the next note. This is not what you are asking for here, but you might find it useful in the future.

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I find such ties hard to read, actually. (I’m thinking of organ scores.) And sometimes the fingering is awkward anyway. I think you could convey the same idea with “always connected” or some other text direction. Since it’s accompaniment, no one will hear the subtleties of moving the hand to reach the next chord. This is assuming you don’t have an accented attack on the patch!

If you’re determined to have the ties, I would add to Daniel’s tip that you can select a wrongly tied note and hit U to untie it without needing the caret.

Also, common notes are easier to spot and tie in the key editor!

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