Slur knockout for Stacked Fingering Workaround

Good morning. I’m trying to figure out a good workaround to knock out slur so that piano chord fingering doesn’t have to be placed so high or slur doesn’t have to arch too much. Erasing background for a fingering font paragraph style doesn’t work because the numbers also knock out each other. I’m trying to create a paragraph style of white text, but I don’t know how to place it between the fingering and the slur.

Any ideas? I’m fairly new to Dorico. Thanks!

I’m not sure there’s going to be a good solution for this at the moment, Greg. You can’t directly influence the z-order of how various items are drawn. You could do something really grim like create the fingering as a regular text item with an erased background attached to the next system, and then drag it into the right place graphically in Engrave mode, because anything drawn as part of the next system will have a higher z-order than everything in the previous system. But that’s pretty foul, really.

I’ll give that a try. Anything to avoid doing it each time in Illustrator. Since I work for publishers, proofs go through several stages, and I need all the engraving in one place.

I will say that editors have noticed a more professional look with Dorico than with Sibelius, and I agree. I look forward to future releases of Dorico.

Now that I try this again, I found a pretty good solution. I knocked out the slur with regular text, using a square (■) character that is white. Then I added my fingering text paragraph style as system text, which shows in front of the regular text.

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Unfortunately, I just realized that the white text style becomes black on a generated PDF. So this solutiion didn’t work after all.

In the past we had to print white and transparent objects in color, otherwise they came out black. But as of Dorico 4.3 this was changed, and we should be able to print in either color or black & white now. So I wonder why that is happening for you.

The printer at this publishing company doesn’t want me to use rich black. With Sibelius, I had to convert the interior pages to grayscale just before sending a book to print. With Dorico, I can generate the PDF directly to 100% black. But it’s good to know the solution will work if I use the color setting instead, then convert the same way I did with Sibelius.