Stereo to Mono

I have an old cassette tape I just digitized, the sound technically is mono.

When listening to the wave file, The left speaker sound is loud yet the right speaker sound has nothing more audiable good old fashioned tape HISS.

What I would like to do is have the sound on the left side play at same volume as on the right. It would be mono but over two speakers with idenical volumes instead of hiss in the right speaker. So kind of a digital silence on the right but then have the left sound also play on the right speakers… Makes sense?

How best to do this on Cubase 5?

Thanks

Superglobe

It would have been best to record just the left output from the cassette to a mono channel.

I assume you now have a stereo channel with content left and hiss right.

An easy way to deal with this would be to pan the channel hard left and route to a mono group.

If you recorded it as a stereo interleaved track, split that into dual mono, pan the useable track center and export it through the stereo bus. This will give you a stereo interleaved file with identical L & R.

^ What they said. Sounds like it got digitally recorded mono out to a stereo channel. Record stereo out from the tape machine OR:

Alternate Option - get Wavelab or something similar and do you what you need in like 3 clicks :wink:

Actually, from your description in this particular case, it might be fortuitous that you recorded in stereo, because had you recorded in mono the unwanted hiss would have been mixed into the signal!

Assuming you recorded (“digitized”) directly into Cubase and now have one stereo track with the characteristics you describe, what Split has already suggested is probably the way to go. I would do it this way though:

  1. In your existing project, create a new mono group track
  2. Route the output of your cassette track to the new group track
  3. Pan your cassette track hard left (F3 to get to the mixer if you need it)
  4. Place your locators left and right of the region you want
  5. Render the file (File/Export/Audio Mixdown)

Once you select 44.1kHz, 16-bit stereo WAV for the export, you can then burn that track onto CD.

As an aside, as zero-access has pointed out, if you have a lot of these kind of jobs to do then WaveLab is a better tool, and in particular WaveLab 7 Elements offers the Sonnox restoration suite at an absolutely incredible price (yes, an older, cut-down version, but ideal for this kind of thing and more than adequate).

Thanks for the replies + suggestions: I have another post now going due to probs with midi timing…
FYI I took the tape out from a cassette player and plugged into a stand alone Pioneer CD Player Burner via RCA cables to analog in and signal then got digitized including digital hiss :slight_smile: Signal was as is…

Cheers…