Switching mono to stereo

+1 Switching to Cubase really made me appreciate Pro Tools’ handling of this with mono-to-stereo plug-in implementation and such. Extremely cumbersome in Cubase.

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Still no response or explanation from the teams. However, considering the amount of votes and likes, and considering the comments of some of us, it seems that this is a long-awaited feature.

Voted for this, too. I mostly use mono tracks (well, apart from some VSTis), and while I am usually happy setting up fx channels reverbs and such, it would be really practical to sometimes just put a stereo delay on a guitar or a doubler effect on a vocal.

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What exactly is the impact? Have you done any measurements, any A/B’ing?
I stopped using mono tracks altogether years ago and never looked back. Can’t say I have noticed any major added processor load, but I have never made any serious tests.

Do you have a specific reason for using mostly mono tracks?

The main reason I mostly use mono tracks is because I’ve always done so :wink: If I record with one mic, I only need a mono track, of course.
But stereo tracks definitely use more CPU, that is a) logical, because plugins have to calculate twice the amount of samples and b) measurable. I’ve done a test, 40 audio tracks each with 8 instances of a demanding compressor plugin. With stereo tracks, it is nearly twice as much ASIO usage than with mono tracks.
Now, whether that makes a noticeable impact on real world projects depends probably very much on how many tracks you have and how many and which processors you use. Still, if not strictly necessary, why would I waste CPU cycles on tracks that most of the time do not need it?

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The only reason I ever use a mono track is to record a mono source completely dry (guitar, vocal, etc.). The only reason for that is “visual”. Meaning, it’s easier to look at one waveform to make initial cuts/fades. After that initial edit, it’s stereo all the way.

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