The Chop notation project

There’s a violin/fiddle technique using a bow bounce off the strings without much directional motion that fiddlers have used for years. It produces a percussive sound, and is called The Chop.

Some of the pioneer practitioners have started an effort to use a system of notation for it:

https://www.caseydriessen.com/chop-notation-project?utm_campaign=Education&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=76772065&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_MKzvmcnqRBZPtjIaTzaaXtl_VibLtnwzF2lt7MMQui2uDt5VeZi4nnqnlHO-1afRdLuMHw9vYn7xMxOnzlJdzVD2rdQ&_hsmi=76772065

Seems like Dorico might have the flexibility to incorporate this.

This example contains a commercial, but for those who might wonder what the technique is, there are examples here:

https://youtu.be/ZfvVyKiiFGE

Very interesting!
But the first step should be to contribute the chop symbols to SMuFL: https://www.smufl.org

If the pioneers want more people to know about their ideas, they might try allowing access to them without demanding people’s email addresses.

From the video on the website, this doesn’t seem to be anything more than a few custom note heads and symbols, both of which Dorico can already handle (but I admit I fast forwarded through most of it, since it spent 30 minutes explaining notation that could be described on one screen display and understood in 30 seconds.)

IMO their idea that notation for the cello should work the opposite way round from the fiddle since the instrument is held the opposite way round is just … weird. It’s like saying “sul tasto” and “sul ponticello” should mean the opposite on the cello from what they mean on the violin! Come to think of it, maybe somebody should tell them that there is already notation for sul tasto, sul ponticello, bowing behind the bridge, etc - they don’t need to invent a different version of it.