The new multi-part editing is a flight simulator type coordination exercise

Hello,

The new multi-part editing in the Key editor has the potential to become a very powerful and efficient tool, but in it’s current state, it does not work well in real-world practice. This has to do with the way Cubaase/Nuendo deals with activating different parts of the windows.

Here are some examples that can be reproduced:

EX 1

  1. Have two midi parts in the key editor active.
  2. Click a part in the timeline.
  3. Filter CC values using an LE preset, observe that they are selected and press Copy.
  4. Select the other part and press Paste. Observe that instead of pasting into the selected part, it creates a new part in the timeline with the copied content.

Explanation: This is because the key editor part of the window was not active, and for some reason that means the part is not active, even though it is selected in the timeline.

Expected results: Selecting a part in the timeline should automatically activate it as a target for pasting. The edge case here would be to create a new part, and that could be done by re-activating the timeline part of the window, but the general case would be that the part you select is the actual one you want to work with.

EX 2

  1. Have two midi parts in the key editor active.
  2. Click a part in the timeline.
  3. Filter CC values using an LE preset, observe that they are selected and press copy.
  4. Click the key editor area and press paste. Observe that nothing happens.

Explanation: This is because the key editor key editor part of the window was not active when copying content from the first part. Even though the actual content was selected.

Expected results: If contents is selected, even though the key editor part of the window is not activated, it should copy/paste as expected in the part that is selected.

EX 3

  1. Have two midi parts in the key editor active.
  2. Click a part in the timeline.
  3. Create some random notes.
  4. Select the other part. Observe that the notes are visually displayed as belonging to an inactive part.
  5. Activate the key editor part of the window.
  6. Select the (inactive) notes. and copy.
  7. Move the cursor somewhere and press paste. Observe that the notes are pasted.
  8. Deselect all notes. Observe that the notes have actually been pasted into the (inactive) part of origin.

Expected results: Content should always be pasted into the active parts, even if the notes were selected in an inactive part.

This requires a description of a suggested workflow from an every-day real world reoccuring scenario:

  • I have a Str.Ens patch with 5 different voices in it.
  • I would like to distribute this to 5 different tracks for legato playback (Vln.1, Vln2, Vla, Vcl, Cb)
  • I open the Str.Ens part, and 5 empty parts located the target tracks.
  • I activate the Vln. 1 part.
  • I see all the notes from the Str.Ens (viewed as belonging to an inactive part).
  • I now just select the notes I want, and press Cut, then Paste.
  • The notes have successfully been moved from the (inactive) Str.Ens part to the current (active) Vln.1 part.

This is how it should work. But instead, we are required to use a pilot-cockpit style mouse click coordination exercise, flipping back and forth between parts, contanstly having to activate the key editor part/timeline of the window in the correct order, to not have the content either be pasted in the timeline, or pasted at all.

This feature has great potential for professionals to have a speedy multi-part editing process, but in it’s current state, it does more harm than good.

The userbase of Cubase/Nuendo is without doubt mainly targeted towards either post-production or media production (games, TV, etc). Those are businesses that has great time restraints, and stress as a factor always need to be counted in as a factor. Therefore, any functions must be designed with maximum intuitivity, and this new feature – with a great potential – is currently not intivitively designed.