Thoughts on WLab

I’ve been a WLab user for many years. I think I started with version 3. The last version I was able to work with intuitively (easy to use) was version 6. After that, everything got more and more complicated. Nevertheless, I always went along with all the updates, although I was no longer satisfied. For some time I’ve been using TRacks 5 mainly for mastering. It’s easy to learn, looks good, sounds good, has good metering (don’t want to advertise, just my opinion). In WLab I only do fine tuning, like: analyze RMS, mp3, write some meta data. That’s it.
Am I the only one who thinks the WLab has become too complicated and not intuitive anymore (for musicians) over the years?

NOT AT ALL. IT HAS BECOME BETTER AND BETTER THANKS TO PG. Not sure why you think it has become “too complicated and not intuitive anymore (for musicians) over the years?” It is especially great now that Justin is doing his “how to” videos…

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Totally agree with Thomas-I’m a relative newb to the WL universe, but its sophistication and wealth of options make it indispensable for people who work with a variety of music and must deliver a variety of formats for the modern world.

Justin’s videos provided a helping hand to wean me off of my old Sonic Solutions/soundBlade habit, and along with PG’s ever expanding software, they’ve added years onto my career.

One thing about the current version (s) is that you can basically customize/make them look pretty much like WL6 … or any workspace you like really … if you want. Sure WL11 is loaded with power and a lot of this you might not use in the context of your personal workflow. Just remove what you don’t want to see from the workspace.

That said, I do make the observation that the tab based screen now is worth thinking about in terms of project and screen organization.

I guess what I’m trying to say is that the latest version of WL can be pretty much anything you want it to be.

I think a fair amount of people miss the Basic CD Creator option but with a little bit of effort, the CD Wizard in the Audio Montage can do the same thing.

does the 11 worth the upgrade from 10? i don’t see any spectacular improvements

Hi!

Download WaveLab 11 Trial and check info on Steinberg
even check out video stuff

regards S-EH

WL11 is a WHOLE LOT BETTER than WL10 IMHO. Once you use it you will not want to go back to WL10. Download the trial and see. (I am referring to the"PRO" version)

Agreed. Lanes & plugins automation have been the biggest help for my workflow – I have yet to see the rendering processing speed improvements others have mentioned though.

I’m seeing better performance on the playback side with heavier CPU Audio Montages when mastering in the box but rendering times are basically the same as WL10.

I think you have to use mainly Track Effects to see any notable advantages from the new multi-core rendering in WL11 and I use mostly Clip Effects and Montage Output FX.

WL 11 Pro on Windows 10 just ‘feels’ better. It’s super solid.

TBH, there were some things that just didn’t work for me personally in WL10 and I pretty much went back to 9.5 until the current build of WL11. But I wouldn’t go back from WL11 now … and don’t see any reason to.

WL 11 has a host of subtle improvements and added features that make it a real pleasure and intuitive to work in.

yes, these two are quite important i guess … done, upgraded to WL11 Pro

I started on Wavelab 3. Version 6 was good… version 7 and 8 were major departures, and were confusing to me as well… but Wavelab 9 and onward were even better than older versions of Wavelab. I LOVE Wavelab 11… It’s amazing. I don’t find it overly complicated at all… I find it very intuitive. The tab based view is AWESOME. I LOVE it!! There are a few little weird issues and/or bugs I’d like to see worked out still, but overall, I’m happier than ever with v11.

-Todd

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Agreed, v10 and especially v11 have improved my work life exponentially. Any time I have to go back to old mastering sessions in Sequoia or REAPER it’s like the Dark Ages.

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Thanks for all the answers. I think it depends on how you use WLab. I’m not a professional and only use WLab when necessary. I spend most of my time in Nuendo creating songs. I may not open WLab for a month or 2. Only when I think the song is finished do I use WLab. It’s basically like using a photo program. You only need it after the holiday to beautify your photos, otherwise rarely (that’s why I’m away from Adobe).
If you work with WLab every day, it is certainly not a problem. But why I opened the thread…wanted to use batch edit and couldn’t find it. After endless searching, I only found batch processing with the help of the online help. The menus are just not Windows compliant.
I do a lot in Nuendo because it’s easier. Adding music to videos is easier, plug-in automation is easier and most importantly, I have a studio channel. There I can control different speaker/headphone configurations with my midi controller…a feature I’ve been waiting for in WLab for ages. I’m also of the opinion that the master’s area looks like Windows 98. No offense meant, just my opinion. As is well known, the eye eats with you. In TRacks there is a button: with/without volume equalization and a button: plugin chain on/off - done. In WLab I always have to look for the button (intelligent bypass).
WLab was more intuitive until version 6, but that’s just my opinion…
PS: Sorry, was lazy today and let google translate :wink:

Hmm ok let’s go…
File>New and find what you need in here
and open it up
that’s it…

and more open WaveLab manual online or as pdf
found here

regards S-EH

I gotta say that I don’t find WL particularly complicated, especially when you consider everything that it does.

There are a few little weird things. I find it slightly odd to use something called a “Batch Processor” to SRC one file. But, it works. Really well. And it gives me all of the options/details that I need. It’s fine.

Anything can do the audio processing. There really aren’t that many differences, though I will say the WL 11 update was worth it just for clip effects parameter automation.

But, when I think about everything else I do…trying to figure out how to do it either in some combination of other applications or in something more all-encompassing like Samplitude/Sequoia, Studio One, or Reaper…WL just feels polished, organized, and well thought out. And, I can change a lot about the computer without worrying about it…which is a huge plus for me.

I just like it, and I wouldn’t want to take a step back.

You don’t need to use the batch processor to do sample rate conversion.

This topic just came up in the Facebook Group too so I’ll post my answer below but this brings up a few questions too.

In the Audio Editor, or even in the Audio Montage if you define a new sample rate in the render settings, how do we know what quality is used? We don’t see an option to set it to “Best” in these cases like we do in the Resampler part of the Master Section. Are both of these cases handled by the setting in Preferences/Global/Audio/Resample Conversion Quality?

Somebody else also wanted to know why there is both a Resampler plugin (only available in the Master Section) and also a dedicated Resampler section in the Master Section. It seems redundant.

When it comes to using an external SRC (or even the WaveLab Batch Processor) to convert to a lower sample rate and use the Custom Montage Duplicate feature vs. just using the Resampler, my comments are this:

If you prefer you can use the Resampler that’s right in the Master Section, but since the Master Section settings are not automatically saved with the montage and require additional saving, loading, babysitting, combined with the fact that you then have to dither after the Resampler and optionally true-peak limit after the Resampler and before the final dither in the Master Section, I just find it easier to manage and verify what’s going on by using the method I do which is external sample rate conversion and using the Custom Montage Duplicate feature to recreate lower sample rate montages and verify things before rendering my lower sample rate master WAV files, DDP, etc.

I also haven’t tested how well this method can perform sample perfect track by track WAV renders of gapless/continuous audio such as live shows, or songs that crossfade.

I prefer that 100% of what I’m doing is always saved and loaded when I close and open an Audio Montage and that’s just not the case when the Master Section is involved. It opens up room for user (or other) error.

For me, that was the most confusing part when I was new to WaveLab.

It’s always the best quality. But this is not the recommended way of doing SRC, has there is no limiter nor dithering, after the internal resampler.

Because one might like to use the Resampler in the Playback Processing section only. That is, to always play at the same SR, but to exclude the resampler from the rendering chain.

For good resampling, I recommend using the Master Section, with the built-in resampler.
Then add your preferred limiter (because resampling alters peaks).
Then add the desired dither at the end, if you render to PCM.
Save this has a Master Section preset. This means you can also use it in the batch processor.