Where do Dorico's devs get their info?

Hello everyone, I’m just curious and in no way is this a criticism. I’m wondering about the source of information for a lot of the symbols, particularly those of extended techniques. As an example, for bowing on the tail piece I have always used this:
Tailpiece Standard
In Europe and the UK I have never encountered anyone questioning it, but Dorico suggests a very different one:
Tailpiece Dorico
Which in fact looks a bit like a tenuto marking.

Now I’m aware that ‘extended techniques’ are not standardized, but I would love to know if there’s full guide out there that would perhaps help me be more standard and consistent in my usage of these techniques.

Thanks for any info!

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I might be completely wrong but I think Elaine Gould’s book was an important reference:-

Behind Bars: The Definitive Guide to Music Notation: (behindbarsnotation.co.uk)

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Yep. In fact, in one of their promo videos, I saw it prominently featured on a stack on a desk.

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They have made references in different threads to reviewing stacks of music as well - WWBD (What would “insert composer here” do…
.

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There is also this reference to consider:

https://andrewhugill.com/OrchestraManual/violin_extended.html

The “fouetté” mark is one that I’ve only ever seen in an edition of the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto (1st mvmt). My friend asked me what it was and I actually referred to Dorico to identify it! I wonder what Dorico’s source is, though.

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Yes that is my main reference source too, but these symbols don’t appear anywhere.

Again, mostly says text indication, no weird symbols.

Where is it? I’m so curious to see where it applies.

It would be at this point: Ray Chen Mendelssohn Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64 - YouTube

I’m afraid the exact provenance of the design of the “bow on tailpiece” glyph in Bravura is lost in the mists of my memory. It will have been from one of the books and publications listed here, but I’m afraid I wasn’t fastidious about recording the source for every single glyph, only in building up a general bibliography.

If there is general agreement that a more appropriate design for this symbol is more explicitly triangular with a pointy tip on the right, of course it’s possible for me to change this in Bravura.

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I don’t recognise that particular symbol - I used to make up my own symbols for that kind of thing…

… and that’s why there are over 3,600 glyphs in the SMuFL reference font! :grinning:

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Indeed and still not enough! Music is a truly complicated language

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Ahh, most of them are unnecessary. (Or the conductor directs you to ignore them.)

Ah yes. Dynamics :wink:

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No worries, I wouldn’t say that the symbol itself needs changing so much as we need more of them attached to stems. After all, we can specify what they mean in the glossary or the first time they appear.

Like Bolen, I have always seen and use triangle on stem for bowing on tail piece. Never the bar used in Dorico


Mendelssohn’s autograph

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Yeah, I saw that on IMSLP, so I’m not sure where those marks came in. I’m basing this off a picture a friend sent.