Writing errata/correction list

Hello, I have a question for all the editors out there (and please excuse me if this question is in the wrong place). I am writing an errata/correction list for an opera edition, and at the moment I am creating a pdf and inserting screenshots (from the manuscript, and from the 1st draft in Dorico), the layout of which is fairly time-consuming. Do any of you have a better way of doing this?

Thanks, and best wishes,

Nick

Graphic slices are the tool for this. You can get the region and the resolution exactly how you want them.

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I agree with using Graphic Slices. Also you can use comments attached to the errata points to manage the associated text. This can be exported as an html table and will maintain an ordered list of bar numbers etc.

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Print out the score. Get a fine red sharpie. Get a ‘doc camera’ (i.e. a webcam with ring light that aims at your desk to take good video of your document) and put the score on your desk in the view of the camera. Open Quicktime and record a video from the camera and audio from the mic. Record the video of yourself making the corrections while verbally explaining them. Send the video to the editors as your errata list. It is the 2020’s not 1990.

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Editor here. I’m just chiming in to prevent anyone reading the suggestion above to see it as anything but an extremely misguided approach. When correcting errors, I want something that I can work through as quickly and systematically as possible, i.e.: a list.

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I think Styx is in fact the editor, and the errata list is meant as a reference to conductors/performers, like you see at the back of any critical edition. No one in their right mind would think it a good idea to present those in video format.

I’d agree that using Comments is the systematic way to go. You just create a Comment on the exact bar and staff you want.

You can’t add images, but something like “Source has E flat, changed to E natural” works well. Or you can use a more formal ‘textual notation’ style, e.g. IV, 3, c c q q c.

Then you export an HTML page that contains all your comments, with the staff name and bar number included.

I regularly use Comments to effortlessly create Critical Commentaries.

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This has all been incredibly helpful. Thank you all so much.

One more question:

Is there an easy way of inserting accidental signs into the comments box?

Nick

Not into the Create Comment dialog, no. If you have a way of typing Unicode characters, you can use U+266D for flat, U+266E for natural, and U+266F for sharp, but Dorico doesn’t provide you with a built-in way to type these characters into the dialog.