Your thoughts on the FX Packs?

I have yet to purchase them. The built in effects were quite average in my opinion, so I’m glad to see more interesting effects in these 2 packs. I’d like to hear your thoughts and opinions, were they worth it?

Are you referring to third party VST audio plugins or Steinberg’s own plugins?

Personally, for VST audio plugins from Steinberg I get a ton of use out of the RND Portico plugins and the Yamaha Compressor 260. I use the Vintage Open Deck also from time to time for tape emulation.

For Third Party plugins, I love everything from Nomad and am very partial to the SSL Duende native plugins, particularly the Channel Strip and the Bus Compressor.

Ah, Cubasis. Sorry, feel free to ignore me :wink:

Hi WinKigu,

There are some independent reviews available online:

http://www.musicappblog.com/cubasis-update-4/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17Ru3fSNcJI

Best,
Lars

I found the FX pretty hit and miss (especially pack 2) and I’m not sure they will impress you over the built in ones, if those don’t do it for you. What you get is more range/options and that might make it worth it.

I do find it an odd route, to provide something of so basic quality as IAP. IMO it sends a bad message about the intended quality bar for the package moving forward and likely means that we and will not see better FX anytime soon.

Meh, it is what it is I guess. $7.99 each does seem a bit steep though, hopefully it’s something that will go on sale. I’d be buying it simply for completionist sake. I’m certain if one kept at it they could find an interesting combination of effects.

I found the new fx to be an improvement on those that shipped with the app, and to be very useful. I think that most built in fx on these “daw” apps can’t really compete with the standalone fx available on iOS (Auria is the exception), but these sets are a step forward as was mentioned above.

The upside of fx within Cubasis, along with the option of multiple instances which is a big one, is the automation possible with in house fx, and the new fx are even more fun to automate (this is true of Micrologue as well, it may not be the coolest synth on iOS but you can make it move move move)

Totally agree.

While they are not going to be as involved as high end plugin/FX, they do fit certain requirements really well. You could also argue that delays and early reflection reverb type FX are pretty much ‘what they are’, especially when mixed into a dense track.

When isolated, you can hear differences between so called high end FX and cheap ones. But once in a mix, you are drawn to the instruments, melody and song. In this instance, it can be really difficult to hear the ‘quality’ of a specific effect compared to another. If you have a solo instrument performance, then this would give the space to hear differences in FX processes, but this isn’t the norm.

Add to this the fact that each effect only costs about £1.00 Then it’s pretty much a no brainer. Even if you bought both packs and only ever used one effect and hated the rest, and that one effect made all the difference to just one song. Then the cost for the all of them shouldn’t even be an issue, if the value of one made all the difference to just one song.

They are all basically just tools, and while they won’t be used all the time, they are there if you feel like you want to experiment or find something just a little different to what is already there. And as Littlewoodg as already said, it’s probably their integration into the workflow that may be of more value.

They are also very resource friendly and don’t chew up your CPU.

People quite often become very critical of FX without really understanding their purpose or real value to a mix. Some of the short reverbs and simple delays in Cubases, easily stand up to classics like the PCM70 and 80, once in a mix. Where these cheaper and less powerful plugins start showing their limitations, is when you compare them to more lengthy complex dense reflections. But for the cost of three pints of beer for a sack full of FX, you can’t really expect a 480 or M5000.

I think they’re insane value for money and a brilliant cheap addition to an amazingly specified cheap DAW, that just keeps on getting better. Besides. It’s what you do with them that counts.

Cheers,
Dave.

I’m glad to see some positive feedback regarding the effects packs. I haven’t bought them yet. But from all I’ve read so far, they appear to be a good value for the price. So I’ll buy them before I consider buying any third party effects.

So far they have not been for me, I’m really after something with a few more features than what’s on offer, closer to what I get on PC and whats in other standalone IOS plugins (a big problem I have with IAA plugins is you can only have one instance at a time). One of the reasons is that Im still a bit of a beginner and I’d like to be able to play with the main FX parameters I have on PC so I can get practice and better understand them.
Mainly Im after a compressor and reverb with a few more features than the standard included ones. TBH I’d be quite satisfied with the compressor if there was only a gain reduction meter so I could see whats going on. Otherwise if there was a pack with one compressor and one reverb with all the main features Id definitely be a buyer!

After complaining about the “shopping cart” replacing the “hide toolbar” button, I ended up purchasing both FX packs. How are they? They’re great! Especially considering the cost. The FX packs address the most deficient aspect of iPad music-making, which is the lack of inline native effects. Both FX packs contain useful, high quality fx that I am beginning to find rather indispensable. Being native inline “filters” (if you will) they work more consistently and efficiently than inter-apps, and I’m far less hesitant to experiment with them. I don’t think they’re quite as full featured as equivalent VST plugins, but then again, that’s why I like Cubasis; doing more with less and prioritizing flow/fun over futzing with busses and indiscernible granular controls.