Can't find my korg micro keys in the midi setup page.

in cubase 10.10 both my korg micro and k49 korg midi controllers showed up in the midi setup page. After i updated to 10.20 update patch, they no longer show up. I Checked in windows device manager and it showed that they both were working properly. Not sure what else to do, i was going to just go back to the 10.10 patch but i’m not sure how to do that.

Any info would be great.
Ty

Hi and welcome to the forums.

I just ran into this with my nanoKontrol after updating the Korg MIDI driver a few days ago. Apparently the Korg Driver will only show the first 10 MIDI ports that it detects (form its point of view). Here is an article I found.

https://support.korguser.net/hc/en-us/articles/115004269166-Windows-can-not-recognize-the-USB-MIDI-device-

Using the KORG MIDI Driver Uninstall Utility (which is different than uninstalling the whole thing, this removes specific ports). When I run it I can see my nano on port 17 and also the expected midi ports on my audio interface etc. (don’t delete these with the utility). But there are also a bunch of other ports that are not shown in Device Manager or available to me from Cubase and other programs, even MIDI OX. Things like MIDI for the now disabled on-board audio. I assume these are all midi devices that once existed on my PC but have been removed. Anyway the utility will not let me delete these non-existent midi ports. Urgh!

At the bottom of the link there is a link to a video (which I have not yet watched) that talks about editing the registry to fix things. Pretty sure that’s what I need to do, but haven’t yet because of… more important things to do.

I just finished doing the video suggestions and it worked for me. The video is blaming the issue on a specific Windows 10 update, but I don’t think that is the case as I’m on Win7. What the video is really explaining is how to get a Korg MIDI port to be 10 or less. I suspect the initial problem of the port being > 10 can result from many things including (but not limited to) Windows updates.

I ended up having to do this twice because I followed along a bit too literally. Basically for every Korg device you have you’ll need to create an alias entry for it. And then in a different section of the Registry you need to assign each of those aliases to the Korg driver. The video uses “midi1” for an alias (and so did I the first time). But what you need to do before hand is use the KORG utility to see which midi port numbers you have available and use one of those. In my case “midi6” was available & worked fine while “midi1” wasn’t & didn’t.

The video zips by fairly fast so be prepared to to pause it frequently to follow along with the Registry navigation. I’d recommend when you get to a needed Registry location you save it as a Registry Favorite so you can easily get back. Watch the whole video but don’t make changes until after seeing the whole thing and creating those favorites. Then you can easily hop around making the changes that are specific to your needs.

FYI this is entirely an issue with Korg’s implementation.

Thank you everyone, the video did the trick, went in and change the registry and both korgs are back in cubase and working as they were before.
Thanks again :slight_smile:

I spoke too soon. Almost everything works now - Cubase and all my regular midi stuff can both see the nanoKontrol midi port and respond to it. Except for one program, the Korg Kontrol Editor; it can’t find the nanoKontrol port. As can be seen in the attached the Korg Utility knows the nano is on MIDI 6, Windows Device Manager sees the MIDI Port, Cubase Setup shows the port, but the Korg Editor cannot find it. One odd thing is that the name of the port varies depending on what program is seeing it. All of these are what happens by default.

I’m starting to think it might be easier to install the Editor on a different PC and make the controller assignments using it. Then bring the h/w back to my DAW. I don’t need the editor to work on the DAW, just to config the nanoKontrol.

I think Korg needs to hire someone with a more complete understanding of MIDI.