Diagnostic files saving to desktop

I am constantly having to move diagnostic files, as they save to my desktop. I’m not gonna create an issue report for these; I’m constantly changing audio devices and none of the things I don’t report happen more than twice.
I am unable to find a setting in Dorico preferences to change the folder to which my diagnostics get saved. Is this not a thing, or am I looking in the wrong place?

Dorico always saves diagnostic reports to the desktop, and there’s no option to have it save them anywhere else. If you’re consistently getting diagnostic reports saved on the desktop, it suggests the audio engine is not able to either exit or launch cleanly on your system. Solving that problem is what we should really focus on, not getting Dorico to save the report it is creating to help you troubleshoot the problem to another location.

1 Like

I would–but there appear to be a lot of different problems–should I put them in one post?
[Edit: for example, I–nevermind, off topic :crazy_face:]

If the problems all appear to be related to either running or quitting Dorico due to problems with the audio engine, yes, post them here.

1 Like

Dorico Diagnostics.zip (711.4 KB)
Dorico Diagnostics–Audio Engine Time.zip (797.2 KB)
About every other time I open the Dorico hub, I get the message that either the audio engine took too long to load or it just died without any explanation. I am able to use Dorico sometimes but lots of the time it just crashes and creates yet another diagnostics file. Any ideas as to why this might be happening? :thinking:

I’ve moved your new thread into this one, since there’s no need to start a new thread when we’re already talking about your specific problems here.

Thanks for attaching your diagnostics. It looks as if only one of the last ten runs of Dorico had any problem starting up, which was the last but one time you launched it. Indeed, it was unable to connect to the audio engine on that occasion. However, the audio engine logs themselves seem to suggest that the audio engine is both launching successfully and exiting cleanly. However, perhaps something is lingering after it logs out that it has exited.

Next time you run into this, run Process Explorer (which is a utility you can download from Microsoft’s web site, and set it so that it runs instead of Task Manager). Right-click on the VSTAudioEngine5.exe process and choose Create Mini Dump, then zip up the resulting file, and attach it here. @Ulf will then hopefully be able to say what is going on at that moment.

1 Like

Thanks :slight_smile:
I’m obviously still learning how this forum works haha

Would this be “Sysinternals Suite”?

That’s right, it’s written by Sysinternals and made available by Microsoft.

1 Like

I am unable to recreate the problem :joy:
I’ll check next time it happens though.

Alright–I wasn’t quite sure what you meant but I opened Dorico (it opened smoothly) and created a minidump of the audio engine. Would this include its history? (Btw, the file is too big to upload here, I may be able to compress it.)
[Edit: compressed it: VSTAudioEngine5.zip (2.4 MB)]

No, we need the mini dump to be created when Dorico is unable to run. When you encounter the problem again, and Dorico hangs because it can’t connect to the audio engine, that’s the point at which you need to create the mini-dump.

I just checked, and VSTAudioEngine.exe does not stay visible when it crashes. Can I still get to it?

As far as I can tell, the audio engine isn’t crashing on your system. All of the logs you’ve supplied suggest that it is exiting cleanly, and there are no crash dumps included in your logs. So I don’t believe the audio engine is crashing. Given that you say you cannot reproduce the problem, and that Dorico is running without any problems, what makes you think that the audio engine is crashing?

One thing to be aware of is that if you quit Dorico and then immediately restart it, you may run into problems, because the audio engine is a separate process independent of Dorico itself, and if you attempt to restart it while it’s still shutting down, that can cause problems. Once you quit Dorico, wait 2–3 seconds before you run it again to ensure that the audio engine has exited cleanly and will be able to be restarted.

I’m sorry, I meant Dorico was crashing. Even then, I could have probably been clearer.

One thing to be aware of is that if you quit Dorico and then immediately restart it, you may run into problems, because the audio engine is a separate process independent of Dorico itself, and if you attempt to restart it while it’s still shutting down, that can cause problems. Once you quit Dorico, wait 2–3 seconds before you run it again to ensure that the audio engine has exited cleanly and will be able to be restarted.

That’s probably it haha
Thanks!

There’s no evidence of Dorico itself crashing, either, since there are no crash dumps, and nor do any of the logs show unexpected termination. When you say “crashing”, do you mean that Dorico is showing a message about the audio engine being slow to respond, with a button to terminate the application? If so, that’s not a crash. A crash is when the application disappears all of a sudden, and Windows shows a message box that says something like Dorico has stopped working (though I don’t know what the exact wording is on Windows these days, as I don’t use Windows myself).

I understand that. That’s what I meant by “Even then, I could have probably been clearer”.