Guitar Techniques tutorial

Is there a video tutorial dedicated to notating and playback performance of the numerous guitar techniques?
Thanks,
Kevin

Did you see this?
https://www.scoringnotes.com/reviews/dorico-3-feature-guitar-notation/

I had not seen this! Thank you!

and the original v3/3.1 Version History (Jan 2020) had information:
http://download.steinberg.net/downloads_software/Dorico_3/3.1/Dorico_3.1_Version_History.pdf

Thanks for that link reviewing guitar techniques in Dorico Pro.

As a composer for mostly classical, jazz and rock music, and one who prefers notation with specific annotations describing technique and performance, I never use tablature or chord symbols for guitar parts. However, I understand their value in the market and in educating a player.

What I’m mostly interested in is how to generate both notation and playback performance for various guitar techniques on nylon string (typically classical, but also jazz and popular styles), steel string and electric guitars. The review cited above does a very good job describing the inconsistencies in the notation for various electric guitar techniques including bends and so forth, and the lack of playback, but my immediate concerns for writing contemporary music for guitar include being able to notate and playback numerous guitar techniques that have become all too common in contemporary scores. There’s a huge range of techniques that, if notatable and performable by Dorico, would truly make it “the future”.

Given Dorico has the ability to create custom graphics, does Dorico have the ability for a user to define (or record) a sound effect to be bound to a custom graphic and to be playable as notated in a score? If we could fill a custom slot or assign a note or collections of notes or a graphic to produce a sound, the the sky is the limit, as they say. Custom graphics mapped to custom sounds.

That would solve a lot of my issues with scoring programs.

Thanks for that link reviewing guitar techniques in Dorico Pro.

As a composer for mostly classical, jazz and rock music, and one who prefers notation with specific annotations describing technique and performance, I never use tablature or chord symbols for guitar parts. However, I understand their value in the market and in educating a player.

What I’m mostly interested in is how to generate both notation and playback performance for various guitar techniques on nylon string (typically classical, but also jazz and popular styles), steel string and electric guitars. The review cited above does a very good job describing the inconsistencies in the notation for various electric guitar techniques including bends and so forth, and the lack of playback, but my immediate concerns for writing contemporary music for guitar include being able to notate and playback numerous guitar techniques that have become all too common in contemporary scores. There’s a huge range of techniques that, if notatable and performable by Dorico, would truly make it “the future”.

Given Dorico has the ability to create custom graphics, does Dorico have the ability for a user to define (or record) a sound effect to be bound to a custom graphic and to be playable as notated in a score? If we could fill a custom slot or assign a note or collections of notes or a graphic to produce a sound, the the sky is the limit, as they say. Custom graphics mapped to custom sounds.

That would solve a lot of my issues with scoring programs.

Hi Kcall

Any sounds that you can load up in Play mode can be accessed via a combination of Expression Maps and Playing Techniques. This video explains how do do it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3p-hXO8wb4

Excellent tutorial! Thank you. While that tutorial shows how easy it is to map an existing sound to a use-defined text or glyph, I’m wondering the following:

Is it possible to create my own samples and add them as custom samples to the HALion Sonic SE library so that I can then assign a custom text or glyph? Logic Pro X has an easy way of creating samples: https://9to5mac.com/2020/06/28/auto-sampler-logic-pro/. I don’t know if they can be exported as a file that can be loaded into HALion Sonic SE (or another playback engine).

For instance, a common technique on nylon and steel string guitar is to use right hand percussion against the strings. You might have a chord being held on the left hand, but the right hand slaps against the strings. I generally notate that by changing the note head, but the playback is not satisfactory in that the notes in the chord are played back rather than the percussive sound made by hitting the strings. I’d like a way to sample my guitar and use that sound for those instances. That’s just an example of creating my own custom sound with the desire to map that sound to a text or glyph and apply it to a selection of notes or chords in the score. There are many other sound effects I would like to incorporate, including percussion on various parts of the guitar body, or strumming across strings behind the nut and others.
If HALion does not allow for custom samples, is there a playback engine library/player that allows user-created samples to be added to their library?

As a side note: I have Note Performer 3 installed. Before I even got started learning Dorico, I think I made NP3 the default playback engine. But while going through the tutorials, I had also worked with the HALion Sonic SE library. Several times, a project lost sound during playback. I would open the player to discover sounds had been removed from their slots. Even still, Dorico didn’t seem happy using multiple players simultaneously. Even then, I couldn’t get sounds to trigger. I resorted to restarting my machine. And often, just started a new project. Not sure what was causing that playback confusion.

Is there something I need to know when using both HALion and Note Performer 3 simultaneously? I’m on a MBPro 16 / Catalina.

Thanks.
Kevin

The only library I have come across that has anything close to contemporary techniques for (classical) guitar is this one:

I thought that at one point the guitar sample were purchasable on their own.

Now, getting them to work in Dorico is another matter - VST comparability, and so forth. But it might be worth looking into, price notwithstanding.

Thanks!