Midi remote in Cubase 12

Ok. So I mapped an external fader to a volume of my vocal track. Then added a couple of tracks to the project. Or may be moved this track to some other position (up or down). Now my controller is mapped to another track? Do I get it right? Does that mean I can’t do any changes to my project after I do the mappings for those mappings are not shifted? That’s kinda frustrating…

Hi,

You don’t map the MIDI Controller to a given track, but to the given track slot. So if your track was originally at position 3, then you add 2 more tracks before, the track becomes at position 5. But you still control the position 3. This is how does MIDI Remote works.

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That’s how it works? I would say that’s how it doesn’t work. As it makes it absolutely useless. When doing music we work with tracks, not “track slots”. You spend time to prepare mappings on your controller, after that you just add a track to your project and after that everything’s lost. Do it once again? Until you do another slight change to the project? Doesn’t look usable…

Hi,

This is how does it work at any remote device. Please, compare with Mackie Control, Eucon, JL Cooper. All of them behave this way.

Hi!
That’s really weird reasoning… Well, if that works poorly on other devices - does that mean Steinberg should copy that behavior for our beloved Cubase?

Hi,

It doesn’t work poorly. It works a logical way and as expected. It’s just different point of view then you expect.

May be I don’t get it… what is logical in connecting automation not to a track but to a slot number? What is use of this automation shifting when adding more tracks? Don’t you think that assigning automation to a fixed track would be a lot more logical and convenient? (If we just forget about how it works on all that old devices). Really on all previous versions of Cubase it was the same with “generic remote” making it useless to me. So when I saw that MIDI remote was totally renewed in C12 I believed that this strange (ok, strange to me) behavior was fixed. But no, it’s still the same… And that’s a pity…

Hi,

I’m very sure it won’t. Because then you would need to remember the assignment for every single project.

How you would assign it in the empty project?

Hi!
It makes sense to me to have an individual controller preset for each project. Because in every project I use controller in different ways. In some projects I don’t need controller at all, in some I need it to control some special parameters of some special tracks.

For example I have a band playing live in my studio. I need to turn on filter on a vocal track sometimes for a second, so I would like to have a physical button for that purpose, not to do that with a mouse. I assign the filter plugin bypass to a button on a controller. And it works until I add any track ahead of the vocal track. And that’s annoying.

Hi,

The convenience with “banking mode” is that your controller can work with every project without setup time.
If you have, for example 8 fader strips on your controler, you can control a set of 8 tracks in the DAW. To reach for more tracks you “bank” through your software mixer. This way, you can control EVERY tracks.

Having said that, i’m pretty sure there is a way to assign a knob/switch directly to a fixed control/track both in the old generic remote and in the newer midi remote. I stopped playing with v12 for a while because i’m stuck with v11 for production reasons.

I remember that you could make a script with “global” assignments set to banking mode and override that setting using the GUI. These settings are stored within project files so you can get best of both worlds.

Cheers,

Thomas

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What is even better with midi remote api is that you can set up more than one bank. For example, if your controller has 8 channel strips, you can have 4 first faders on one bank and 4 last on a different bank and they’ll scroll independently. You can also configure banks to scroll only through a certain type(s) of tracks.

And you can arrange different configurations on different pages so you really get a lot of flexibility.

Cheers,

Thomas

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