Paint finish irregularities

This is one for the experts.
In my “studio” I have latex paint with a satin finish on the walls. The ceiling paint is, of course, a flat latex paint. Right smack dab in the middle of the wall on my left side is a circuit breaker panel with a metal door and, of course, an oil based gloss finish paint on it. I swear I can hear the increased reflections off of that panel door! Should I account for this in my mix? It there a way to have Cubase account for it and correct it automatically? If Microsoft Word can finish my sentence for me, why can’t Cubase correct for the paint finish on my walls?
J.L.
:astonished:

Actually it can!

Regardless, it’s not yet 1st April!

Just hang an aborber panel over it.

Yep, that’s a big problem, but easily fixed.

You should smear some vinegar, with basil emulsion, on that oil-based breaker panel. The vinegar combines with the oil to realign the crystal lettuce. It will sound much tastier afterwards. :wink:

Also, turn any acoustic guitars hanging on the wall, around backward with the hole facing the wall, or better yet, take them out of the room when recording with an open mic. Resonating items in the room must be eliminated or dampened. :ugeek: :laughing: (laughing at self :unamused: ) or as Swamptone suggests to make it more palatable.

I think there’s an oil to latex conversion plugin you can buy from Slate - VPT - Virtual Paint Treatment - $499 on Musicians Friend, but wait for a coupon.

NO NO! Acoustic guitars are perfect Helmholtz resonators and can be used to dampen problematic frequencies. :stuck_out_tongue:

Only if you stuff them with rock-wool :mrgreen:

and egg crates! :laughing:

ah, drumming up a little business here, Steve? This may be a new specialized area of ‘Electro Engineering’ with you being the perfect man for the job, being an ‘Electro-Muso’. :ugeek: Wish you well :smiley:

[/quote]
NO NO! Acoustic guitars are perfect Helmholtz resonators and can be used to dampen problematic frequencies. :stuck_out_tongue:[/quote]

Only if you stuff them with rock-wool :mrgreen:[/quote]

Had some rock-wool leftover and stuffed up a 12 string and 6 string, resulting in killing that nasty problem I was having in the 305 hz to 377 hz range. :nerd:

and egg crates! :laughing:[/quote]

Went to the ‘Hen House’, but the chickens wouldn’t let me have any crates, so this portion of then studio upgrade is on hold. Has anyone else had success with this technique? :confused: (speaking of technique, my quoting technique sucks)

Chicken feathers would probably work too… I think there’s software that will help you to pinpoint where to staple the chickens on the wall…

[/quote]
Chicken feathers would probably work too… I think there’s software that will help you to pinpoint where to staple the chickens on the wall…[/quote]

Probably on top of the Acoustic Helmguitarholtz resonators :unamused:

Insert suppository, wait 5 minutes, topic irrelevant now! :unamused: :laughing:

though Swamptone’s suggestion might work the same way… :confused:

Stuff the breaker panel with rockwool…

Actually you could save a lot of bother and money - simply stuff the rockwool in your ears.

… or chicken feathers … they may be cheaper, if you live in (or close to) a farm :sunglasses:

Feathers tend to tickle, but chicken droppings - kneaded together into a pliable masse, now that might work… :bulb:

Of course stuffing chicken droppings into your ears wont change the room acoustic, far better to staple chickens to the wall.

Maybe you could find a bulk buy on some of these …

Or, if you prefer quality over quantity …

http://mcphee.com/shop/deluxe-rubber-chicken.html

I can’t look at a wall now without seeing perfectly aligned rows of tightly spaced rubber chickens from ceiling to floor.

I wonder how well they would work? :confused:

I understand it depends on what rubber chickens you use. Some swear by Mogami; others say that Hosa works just as well in blind tests.