Pls Help Exported File Longer than Original

Hey Cubasers,
I edit video in Vegas Pro 12. I export to .wav, the audio settings are 16bit, 48000 sample rate and import into Cubase 6.
After editing the audio the Exported .wav file is about 20 seconds longer than the original. The exported file is rendered the same at 16bit 48000 sample rate.

I can time time compress the audio in Vegas and it lines up, but the pitch is off.

Is there a setting that needs to be adjusted?

Thank you in advance for any assistance.

-bK

I’ve found a work around, am now able to import and export the files w/ the proper length and pitch.

The .wav files are importing into cubase longer than the original. Originals export fine from Vegas but are stretched when imported into Cubase and of course exported stretched. I still haven’t determined if Vegas or Cubase is having the issue w/ the .wav file though.

http://i215.photobucket.com/albums/cc70/tr-stompboxes/cubaseimportissue_zps5e198dea.png

If anyone has any tips that would be great but again I’m working now.

Hey,

What about your Project Setup settings? Once you open it, is there any yellow/orange text? Can you try to click on the Fet From Video button beside the Frame Rate? Is your frame rate stes the same, as your video?

Open the Pool window, and check, the audio file is really in the 48kHz samplerate (and it’s not reampled in the Cubase). And check, this audio file is not in the Musical mode. Just for sure.

Hey Martin,
Thanks for the reply! I checked the setting you mentioned and they look good.

Open the Pool window, and check, the audio file is really in the 48kHz samplerate:
Yes, the sample rates are 48kHz for the files that are rendered as 48kHz. These audio tracks are stretched.

(not reampled in the Cubase)
Sorry, not sure what this setting is

And check, this audio file is not in the Musical mode. Just for sure.
Yes, audio files is not in Musical mode.


As far as the video settings, I’m just exporting (extracting) the .wav so no video is imported to into Cubase only audio.

The audio info from the videos are:

Audio info from Camera 1:
Sample rate: 48.0kHz
Constant bit rate
Bit rate 128
Format: AAC (Advanced Audio Codec)
Bit rate mode: Constant
Compression mode: Lossy
Stream size: 35.6 MiB (1%)

Audio from Camera 2:
Sample rate: 48.0kHz
Constant bit rate
Bit rate 256
Format: AC3 (Audio Coding 3)
Bit rate mode: Constant
Compression mode: Lossy
Stream size: 11.2 MiB (2%)

When I render a 16 bit 48kHz .wav which is the camera’s original audio spec from Vegas Pro 12 and import it into Cubase 6, CB6 s-t-r-e-t-c-h-e-s and detunes the audio file whether I select Sample Rate (48.0 kHz to 44.1 kHz) or not.

When I render to 44.1kHz 16 bit .wav it imports OK. (This is my work around)
When I render to CD quality .mp3 it imports fine. (This is my other work around)

The initial goal was to edit in the original audio sample rate of 48kHz, but the video audio is aac and ac3 so the files were converted to 48kHz .wav to work in CB6.

My conclusion is that there’s something missing in translation when Cubase imports the 48kHz .wav.

Also, the 48kHz wave file that is exported from Vegas plays fine in other players like Windows media player and VLC.


P.S.
I’ve since completed the audio editing for this project in Vegas Pro 12. I’ve been using Cubase since SX and I think I would have gotten better quality audio mix and done much quicker using Cubase if I was able to get the audio imported properly from the getgo.

This is the first time I used C6 on a project like this. I’ve never had any issues w/ C4 (skipped C5) but I didn’t load C4 on my current DAW.

I have a couple of other projects like this and would like to use C6 for the audio work.

OK I figured it out.

Investigating this more I re-read Martin’s replay and re-checked the Project Setup parameters.
Changed the Sample Rate from 44.1 kHz to 48 kHz. Cubase re-converted the tracks to accomidate the new setting and the stretched 48 kHz audio files are now the proper length and pitch.

I always thought that Cubase auto selected this in the past but may be a manual thing now.
Now I can edit future video audio in native 48 kHz sample rates!

Thanks Martin for directing me down the right path! (:

Great! Glad I helped.