Question about playing techniques and percussion maps

I am working on some percussion maps, and I am running into a bit of a dilemma about how it is best to handle the situation.

The example I have in front of me deals with a thumb roll on a tambourine. This would require the use of 2 playing techniques. Thumb + Roll, since there is also a shake roll.

Question 1: Thumb is not a “technique” in the list. Is there a way for users to add to the list?

Question 2: If I could add to the list, one could probably just create a technique called “Thumb Roll”

I am really not sure about playing techniques and the best to handle a situation like this.

Robby

Here is a graphic to explain a little better:
Screen Shot 2020-07-03 at 4.14.04 PM.png
There are techniques such a fist, knee, fingertip, etc. None of these are currently in the list.

Robby

I have a similar problem. My workaround was to use technique names from other instruments that I likely will never use anyway.
It’s a less than ideal hack though.

I believe there are literally hundreds of ethnic instruments from all over the world. It’s probably not even reasonable to guess how many kinds of unique techniques there could be for all these instruments.

It makes more sense to allow custom techniques as a write in than trying to cover them all.

Even before the moderator has told on this topic, you can go here and check that your problem may be overcome - steinberg.net/forums/viewtopic.php?p=950507

When you edit a playing technique, you can create a new playback technique to go with it.

In the Edit Playing Techniques dialog, click on the “Edit” button next to “playback technique” and you get the Edit Playback Techniques dialog.

After you created the new playback techniques for your tambourine, go to Play mode and edit an expression map to define what they do (i.e what key switches they use).

Rob,

That is perfect!!! Thank you so much!!!

Robby

I would advise all percussion users to study this post from Daniel Spreadbury himself :
https://www.steinberg.net/forums/viewtopic.php?p=899043#p899043

Thanks Marc!!! I appreciate the info. It is good to read and reread this information. Dorico is a very complex program. Has a lot of terrific features, and some of them are not an “every day use” function. Causing me, and possibly others, the potential to forget how things work.

Robby