Why Cubase sounds so dull/undynamic in relation to Reaper?

Hi everyone,

I’ve been a Cubase user since 1997 (Cubase VST v3.5 etc., now on Cubase Artist 8) and although I generally like the way Cubase operates (above all the comprehensive midi and composition tools), at the end I almost always go to Reaper to work out an already begun composition in Cubase.

Why that? Maybe you won’t believe it but first of all due to the better sound (engine?) of reaper. In my view the sound in Reaper is more ‘clearer’ and more ‘powerful" (dont’ know exactly how to describe this). Almost all DAW users say it cannot be the case that differences in sound exists between different DAW but I think you can influence the quality of the audio output of a DAW by a neat programming style.

Also I’ve heard maybe the difference in sound (quality) has only to do with the ‘panning Law’ which you can set in almost all DAW. Therefore I only have to set the ‘correct’ panning law in the project settings’?
Anyone has a clue and can help out?

Thanks in advance.

I have no input, but am curious to hear the responses. :slight_smile:

I gave Reaper a month long try out back when Steinberg redesigned the mixer.
There is no difference in sound quality, only in how you achieve said quality.
The pan law will make a difference.
You can change that in the Project Setup Window.

Hello,

This is a “between the ears” :wink:

Cheers,

Chris

You’s making it that.

So is the OP going to try to duplicate the Pan Law settings and report back to us?

I am inclined to believe it would a micro difference, and more in the ear than the speaker.

+1
When two daws sound different… check the pan law. It’s always the pan law.

Oh, how I looooove these threads! :smiley:

Maybe you won’t believe it but first of all due to the better sound (engine?) of reaper.

Reaper does NOT have a better sound, nor does it have a better engine.

In my view the sound in Reaper is more ‘clearer’ and more 'powerful"

Your view - for one of many reasons - is incorrect, AND you have already been proven incorrect a looooong time ago.

Almost all DAW users say it cannot be the case that differences in sound exists between different DAW but I think you can influence the quality of the audio output of a DAW by a neat programming style.

Umm, no. 1 + 1 = 2. Always.

Also I’ve heard maybe the difference in sound (quality) has only to do with the ‘panning Law’ which you can set in almost all DAW. Therefore I only have to set the ‘correct’ panning law in the project settings’?

Pan laws are set in options/prefs/etc. In Cubase, it’s set in Project > Project Setup. Not sure where it is in Reaper.

Pan law will not cause the DAWs to sound different. But it CAN give you a perceived difference that does not exist.

Now I have a question for you - do you know what a null test is and how to properly perform one?

Haaaaaaaaaaa Haaaaaa haaaaaaaaaaa

I remember when dudesssssssss complained about the sound in Cubase VST compared to Logic. Oh it’s the “pan law” they said.

Turned out it wasn’t the pan law, but simply Cubase VST sounding muddy. Cubase SX was released with new sound “engine” and proved that.

Haaaaaaaaaaa Haaaaaa haaaaaaaaaaa


Boinnnnnnnngggggggggggggggggggg

:laughing: How ya doin’, Driftpunch?

Aloha c,

Is there anyway you can post a couple of examples of the
same work (done in both DAWs) so we here can do an AB?

Might be interesting to read what everyone hears and thinks
about the two diff examples.

Good Luck!
{’-’}

{’-’}

In the audio domain, it’s called PEBSAC, as opposed to general computing’s PEBKAC.

Try in mono all the way through each.