Peak normalizing

Hi,
I was wondering if proper peak normalizing is available again in WL10 (after it has been unavailable in WL8 and WL9).
Please read in my previous posts. The reason why I’m still using WL7.
https://www.steinberg.net/forums/viewtopic.php?f=244&t=94872
Thanks!
Best
Philippe

There is the option “Equalize Peak Levels” (not new to WaveLab 10), that sets all clips to the same peak level, but this is a limiting function only, in the sense, the loudness clip will never be amplified. IOW, this is a normalizing to the value Min Of(specified peak value, peak of loudest clip).

My understanding from your other discussion:
“What I am missing is the WL7 MetaNormalizer function “Normalize Mix (Master section input)”.
What I want to do: after having adjusted all clip levels in my montage, I want to make sure that the maximum peak level entering the Master section is 0dBFS, for example”

You’ve set your clip levels and you don’t want them to relatively change. You just want to raise (or lower) them all equally until the maximum peak level at the output of the montage is 0db.

You can do that in the metanormalizer by using the settings in the attached picture. It raises (or lowers) the level at the output of the montage by targeting a ridiculously loud artificial loudness of -2 LUFS (to cover any possible needed gain change), but which is constrained by a maximum allowed peak of 0db. It’s not user friendly like the Wavelab 7 method (which raises or lowers all the clips equally, and shows visually what’s going on, which is really the way to do this), but it does the same thing. The outcome is the same. The gain change is shown on the Effects tab on the Montage Output button. But I agree it would be better to have the Wavelab 7 clip gain method used again.

Actually the Clip section is not even needed in the metanormalizer since it’s not doing anything the way I set it up, so the Clips section can be turned off. Just the settings in the montage section will do it.

Hi bob99,

Thanks for your feedback.
Yes, that is exactly what I want to do and which, to me, seems a logical final step before rendering, so as to be sure that your highest peak hits a certain level (for example 0dBFS for an audio CD and maybe less before a specific audio encoder).

The workaround does work, but without having any visual feedback of what is going on. That is very dangerous!
And how shall I explain that workaround to less experienced users in our organization?
I will not start using that.

WL7 (and before) had a clear visual feedback and you could see all clips’s waveforms increase or decrease according to this setting.

Philippe