Reverb on MIDI Track?

How do I add reverb to a MIDI track? I have created a piano track using HALion, and can’t find an option for reverb. I see many options when I try to add an insert or send effect:

  • Arpache 5
  • Arpache SX
  • Auto LFO
  • Beat Designer
  • Chorder
  • etc etc

BTW: Is there an instruction manual I can search on and find my own answers to this stuff? Did not see anything in the support/knowledge base section of Steinberg.net

You insert reverb in (or send to a reverb from) the VST Output Channel that Halion outputs its audio to.

MIDI Channels are just data. MIDI inserts manipulate MIDI and that’s all. Reverb and delay and compressors, etc, are audio FX. :wink:

Method 1: Click the button on each track that looks like an e. It is avialable in both the mixer track close to the fader, and in the instrument description to the left of the tracks. It will bring up the EQ section and two racks, one for inserts and one for sends. In the inserts you can insert plugins like reverb. (Click on an empty rack space and it will list all available plugins).

Method 2: In the mixer and in the “insert” section of the mixer, just add the plugin of your choice. This is exactly the same as method 1 however accessed in two different ways.

Methode 3 (and my preferred way for reverb) Create a FX track and insert the reverb there (using Method 2). Set the reverb to 100% wet. From the MIDI track using the send rack found in method 1 or the send section in the mixer, find the FX track and insert it. Turn it on and use the slider for reverb amount (this then become the Dry/Wet mixer). (Sometimes you need to go in and out of solo mode to activate the reverb).

BTW: Is there an instruction manual I can search on and find my own answers to this stuff? Did not see anything in the support/knowledge base section of Steinberg.net

In the help menu of Cubase & on the downloads page

http://www.steinberg.net/en/support/downloads.html

Just to clarify re: Rumdrum’s explanation above.
These methods will work on an Instrument track (which can also contain MIDI events) or an instrument output (that has been loaded to the instrument rack) but will not work specifically on a MIDI track.
As you’ll see for yourself, there is no “E” button on a MIDI track and the inserts section of the mixer for a MIDI track only has the same MIDI inserts you already saw (And sends can not send to a Reverb)

As Enjneer explained it’s the instrument output that is being triggered by the MIDI track that you need to find and apply your effect to.

You can also add numerous effects, including Reverb directly in Halion’s (also GA4’s) built-in mixer.
You should find documentation on everything in the Documents folder in the Steinberg… installation folders of your computers system drive (or wherever you installed the program. You should also be able to call them up from your Help Menu on the Cubase MenuBar.

Thanks guys - I appreciate all the input. I will dig through the documentation to see what I can figure out.

In this thread there was explanation that the methods discussed to add Reverb were for Instrument tracks because they have audio which reverb acts upon. And that reverb won’t act directly on MIDI tracks because they output MIDI data. So far I get it and can insert Reverb in Instrument tracks with no problem.

But as for the original question of adding Reverb to a MIDI track, not an Instrument track, the answer was:

“As Enjneer explained it’s the instrument output that is being triggered by the MIDI track that you need to find and apply your effect to.”

So exactly how does one go about doing this and finding this illusive instrument/audio output of a MIDI track ?

Specifically for example I have a MIDI track and an F11 rack populated with a few instances of Kontakt and have some
Kontakt library instruments loaded in them. And they play fine. But I don’t like the Reverb that is built into Kontakt.

So exactly where do I find where these audio outputs from Kontakt are, and how do I insert REVERB in them ?

Same question for a non-Kontakt MIDI instrument like Halion ?

This is really buggin’ me and Youtube videos on inserts, sends, FX just confuse me all the more. I would really, really appreciate the specific instruction for adding Reverb to MIDI channels for this slow dunderhead. Tnx.

Bob

Not sure which bit is catching you out here. In the MixConsole the Kontakt outputs should be visible unless you have some channel types hidden… You insert reverb like you would insert reverb on any mixer channel (or you could send to a shared reverb on an FX or group bus)

Bingo. That clears it up once and for all now for me. There are so many places to look (like those confusing little “e” edit icons all over the place), inconsistent terminologies (track, channel…) on and on. And for awhile there I was getting reverb from nowhere thinking it was baked into the sample until I figured out it was coming from Kontakt. In any event THANKS Grim for the help !

Bob

There are so many places to look (like those confusing little “e” edit icons all over the place)

Ha…I suppose you’re right. Often in Cubase what may seem like many places is in fact different views of the same thing…For example the inspector, the channel edit (e button) and the MixConsole with rack can all access the same stuff more or less.

While you can’t add a VST reverb to a midi track, almost any midi synth has a reverb builtin which can be activated by using a CC (MIDI Control Change Messages) controller event, CC91 and CC92 see http://nickfever.com/music/midi-cc-list for more controller information.

Unless you are looking for some special effects the reverb should “always” be the same reverb for the whole mix colour to place it in the same “room”. This is why you would commonly use a FX track for Reverb and use “Send” from the other tracks instead of using different Reverb as insert on each track.

I agree :slight_smile:

But only when wanting traditional mixes, for some genres you want creative FX and then there are no rules :slight_smile:

Unless you are looking for some special effects the reverb should “always” be the same reverb for the whole mix colour to place it in the same “room”

I think modern production has moved somewhat beyond just simulating a band playing in a room…it still has it’s place for sure but I’m not sure I’d agree it’s “always” the way to go.

Haha Agree again!

But then it is a conscious choice and then you are truly looking for something special effects, right? However happy go lucky with different reverbs seldom cut a good mix.

I’m not sure what your definition of a special effect is…I would say I’m after a specific effect perhaps rather than anything special.
Maybe I put a small room on drums but prefer a plate on vocals…that kind of thing.

Or the luscious UAD AKG BX 20 Spring Reverb on guitars.

Thank goodness there are no EFX police to hand out Audio Violations. I’d be in real trouble. “No officer I was not drinking when I applied a reverse reverb over the drum buss.”

Anything besides what you would experience in a “natural” setting (like a live concert) would be regarded a “special”. To leave the “natural” could also be considered as “creative”. Another OP mentions “reverse reverb on the drum bus”. A result of a thought, an idea that seemed to fit that particular production. It is “special” for that production (or a part of it). Perhaps it is a kind of a “trademark” for a certain artist.

I also use reverse reverb from time to time, or (I prefer convolutions) use a “creative” IR. Or, use alternative reverb sources, like built in reverbs on synths. However it is out of the “natural” and thus “special”. Experiments, innovation and creativity is what drives everything forward and should always be encouraged. However it is of no disadvantage to know the basics of how sound behaves in a “natural” environment. No rules. No police. But basic knowledge is great.