New versions?

You still can do that in C13. They just changed the location where you do that in the inspector. I’m out of town or I would post a .gif. I’m sure someone will soon.

This just proves my point - wherever they moved it to (why?) muscle memory will cause you to go to the old location.
It’s like when you go to the supermarket to buy some jam, which you know is in aisle 10, so you go straight to it, but since your last visit the manager has decided that jams will no be in aisle 10, they will now be in aisle 22. But you don’t know that, so you have to go searching and maybe they no longer even sell jam.

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Your request would make Cubase even more difficult to develop, debug and test, as you’d saddle the application with even more technical debt. The thinking in IT is moving away from “compatibility at all costs” for these reasons - even Microsoft, which has historically left superseded features in place and not deprecated older hardware, protocols and APIs is moving towards faster deprecation of old features, protocols, hardware and APIs. An allied problem is that the more code there is, the greater the attack surface and, therefore, the risk of security bugs.

Moreover, introducing new features and modernising code can require changes that break older code. Typically, if something is redesigned, it isn’t as simple as leaving the older option in place with a preference to select it. The user interface is a particular challenge, as there is a broad spectrum of views between “Cubase looks ancient - modernise it” and “don’t change anything because I don’t want to have to adjust”.

You have a choice - stick with a version you are happy with and accept that, after a while, it will become unsupported, or keep upgrading and adapt to the changes.

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if they spent more time on the new functions and stopped messing about with the tried and tested there wouldn’t be a problem . . a 'if it aint broke dont fix it ’ banner aught to be put round steinbergs developement office

  • if i buy a new version and dont like it can i get a refund . . ??
    bottom line is . . they should let you know what they’ve altered in the things they haven’t changed ( LMFAO !!)

QUOTE : It’s like when you go to the supermarket to buy some jam, which you know is in aisle 10, so you go straight to it, but since your last visit the manager has decided that jams will no be in aisle 10, they will now be in aisle 22. But you don’t know that, so you have to go searching and maybe they no longer even sell jam.

good analogy♪♪

Or it was necessary to move the jam even though its been on isle 10 for years. A good grocery manager will weigh the disadvantages and benefits of such a move.

I too get frustrated, but rarely seek out the manager asking for reasons. I highly doubt an experienced manager makes such important decisions on a whim knowing frustrated customers will be going to isle 10. He knows his store, and knows his customers demographics.

The very few times I have thoroughly pursued such moves, there were good reasons. Sure, you hear jam placement experts with years of jam placenent experience, but they are always on the outside looking in, not knowing all the inner workings of that particular grocery store.

However if he gets too many frustrated customers he may move the jam back admitting the move was a failure.

Im surprised no one has showed you the new location. Ill be home tomorrow to help if no one else has by then.

should have left the jam in row 10 . . . end ov
lets hope the next version will have the jam and everything else thats
already there left in the same place so we can get on with the music
instead of reaching for the pdf manual every time something goes on
a walkabout at the whim of an over enthusiastic programmer

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@Googly_Smythe

You are right! Unless I’m overlooking something, it’s not in the Inspector. It is in the new Left Zone Channel next to the Inspector.

At the very bottom where the Track Name is listed. Mouse over the right side of the Track Name. (yeah I don’t like mouse-overs either) and a arrow will appear opening the Select Color box.

For myself I use a Key Command i.e less clicks to achieve the same.

You can also alt/option click the original location

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IN A NUT SHELL
dont forget if you pay your dosh and you dont like your shiney new upgrade you can always get a refund :joy: :joy: :joy: :joy: :joy: :joy: :joy:
as the ageless wokes ever since atari pro12 will keep telling you :-1:
‘if you dont like it go back to your previous version’ ( wish i had a penny for every one of these childish comments :smile: )
wot a load of bollox

SB only ever use the most up-to-date frameworks available, which is why users have access to such innovative features in a timely fashion so older features and their contemporaries will only ever be available, in older versions of the software.

You have no clue, buddy.

:joy: :joy: :joy: :joy:

If you are a coder or sit and play with gear and mixing board all day, then new versions are great,BUT, if you are a musician, this relearning, reformatting your mind and generally trying to figure out how the genius who did the changes when for the most part nobody wanted, then this is a drain of your continuity and creative flow and all that goes right out the window…I read somewhere that most daw users like calkwalk, cubase, reaper and so on are home studios where the users are musicians…to me the 90’s was the highlight of cubase…minimal, stable and easy work flow compared to others of that time…

As was already said several times in this very thread, then don’t upgrade. Plain and simple, problem solved.

If that tool and its functionality is THAT critical to you and your productivity (or your monetary income and livelihood), why are you running to change it and cause yourself a headache? The previous version doesn’t magically stop working when a new one comes out, and no one is holding a gun to your head telling you to update it either.

As has also been said, some of us want the new features, we just don’t want to lose the old, eg LoopMash.
And moving existing features from here to there doesn’t improve the workflow of existing users, it just irritates. And renaming features (iterative quantize is now soft quantize)at the same time as moving them around just comes across as deliberate obfuscation on the part of the devs (I’m not saying it actually is, you understand!). Even the support here can’t keep up with the changes, most of which are unnecessary.
.
Gawd, I promised my self I wouldn’t rant so much.

Well said if that was the case and we lived in a glass jar, but we don’t and as windows versions start to decline and they stop the support sometimes you are forced to go to another os and then issues start up with a current programs you love and they start issues that are not being supported…so, having say all that, it’s just life and ya deal with things…

When you’re a home studio user maybe, even then that’s a personal decision. Cubase is a professional studio DAW, and 99.9% of professional installations are not upgrading anything on their computers until something breaks and they have to… You don’t throw a wrench into your money earning machine and watch it take your business down with it.

That includes the operating system. Hell, the Kohl’s by my house was still running Windows 7 on their cash registers just a few years back.

Maybe, but what percentage of Steinberg’s sales are represented by hobbyists vs professionals do you think?

That’s a completely unrelated observation. Kohl’s has over a thousand stores across the whole country. What benefits would they gain by upgrading their cash registers to Windows 11?

Your argument here is valid and I fully agree.
It does pose the question though, why does upgrading need to be the source of such headaches?
My personal philosophy is to view my DAW as a single unit comprised of both hardware and software. And although I purchase every new version of Cubase, with a few exceptions over the years, they don’t get installed on my main rig. When the time comes where I feel a new rig is in order, it gets the latest version of both software and hardware.

Yes I agree…just last year I upgraded my computer to the current 12th /13th generation of the i7 intel cpu w/128g ram…thought it was time after using my 4th gen all these years…I have a 3 boot system…win10, win 7 and win xp…I can easily go back in time and do things that others wanted weeded out…but I have never seen a professional studio here in LA use cubase for more than midi and some audio editing and then transferring tracks to protools…I still use cube 6,7 and have 10 and mixbus 32c [superior mixing and tracking sound]…but after review all the newer versions of cubase with friend, I don’t feel the need for those upgrades…the best I have ever used was nuendo 3/4…great work flow and solid…but as in all conversations, there really is no real answers, just personal preferences…